What people are saying about Detroit hockey legend Ted Lindsey

Ted Lindsay, who played on the famed “Production Line” with Gordie Howe, died on Monday at the age of 93. He is a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame and his #7 is hanging from the rafters in Detroit.

Known for his toughness on the ice and kindness off it, Lindsay was a member of four Stanley Cup champions in the 1950s with the Red Wings: in 1950, 1952, 1954, and 1955. He scored more than 800 points in his career, using a rugged style of play from the left wing position.

A Renfrew, Ontario native, Lindsay was selected as one of the 100 Greatest Players in Hockey History in 2017. Lindsay served as general manager of the Red Wings in the 1970s and guided the team to their first playoff appearance after a nine-year absence. He was named the NHL Executive of the Year for his efforts. He briefly coached the team for parts of two seasons in 1979-80.

Lindsay was a relatively small player but he played with an aggression that belied his size. With Howe and Sid Abel, he formed one of the best and most famous lines in the history of the sport. His brutalizing style of play helped lead to rules against elbowing kneeing. He earned the nickname “Terrible Ted.”

But Lindsay turned into a different man once he took off his skates. Teammates admired his gentlemanly nature and he was known for assisting younger players to acclimate themselves to the league. His leadership on the ice was instrumental in forming the Red Wing dynasty of the 1940s and 1950s. He played on eight Detroit teams that advanced to the Stnaley Cup Finals, starting in the 1944-45 season when he was a rookie. Howe joined the team two years later, and Lindsay helped influence the young star in adopting a similar rough style on the ice.

The hockey world paid tribute to Lindsay on Monday after his passing. The NHL Alumni Association honored Lindsay, who helped form the Players Union and fought for financial gains for players.

And the Red Wings official Twitter account includes a video tribute:

Lindsay spent part of his career with the Blackhawks:

Here’s video proof of how great Mr. Lindsay was:

A reminder that Ted Lindsay started one of the greatest traditions in sports:

More tributes poured in from around the world:

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About Dan Holmes

The editor of Detroit Athletic Co. blog, is the author of Ty Cobb: A Biography. He previously worked for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, NY, and worked for Major League Baseball as a web producer. He contributed to Sock it to 'Em Tigers: The Incredible Story of the 1968 Detroit Tigers, and Deadball Stars of the American League. Follow him on Twitter at @thedanholmes or visit his personal blog at danholmes.com.